Practising Patience on Pacific Passages!

Patience is a virtue, right?
Practice makes perfect…..
We’ve had plenty of practice so far on our Pacific passages, but we are far from perfectly patient yet!

However, when we look at this, we are once again reminded just how lucky we are and why we do what we do!

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After exactly 8 days at sea, sailing from a small bay called Hakaotu in Ua Pou, Marquesas, we finally made landfall at our first atoll, Tahanea, in the stunning Tuamotu Archipelago.

Our original plan had been to sail the 420NM passage to Raroia in the central part of the Tuamotus, however the wind, when it finally started blowing 6 days into our passage, had other plans and after 2 changes of direction, we finally decided to submit and we set a course for Tahanea Atoll, an uninhabited atoll some 140NM to the south west of Raroia.

We began our passage at 1215 on Friday 19th May from the very rolly but impressive Hakahetau bay in Ua Pou DSCN2169, where we had stocked up with fruit and vegetables for the next 3 to 4 weeks.

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We had been advised that fresh provisions are difficult to find in the Tuamotus and the islanders there love to trade lobster and coconut crab for fresh pamplemousse (grapefruit) and limes from the Marquesas.

As we set sail down the west coast of Ua Pou, we spotted a lovely, calm anchorage and after a couple of hours with too much wind for the spinnaker, but not enough to sail just with the headsail, we decided that, with a 420NM passage ahead of us, we would turn back and repair the main sail, which had ripped on Day 17 of our 38 day passage from Panama to the Marquesas, almost 2 months ago. When we had tried to do the repairs before leaving Nuku Hiva, after we scored some sail material and purchased some Sikaflex and sail tape from Kevin at Nuku Hiva Yacht Supplies, rain had stopped play on numerous occasions.

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After repairing the mainsail, we finally departed at 0630 on Monday 23rd May. Unfortunately, we had missed the weather window, as the forecast was for light winds for the coming week, but the job had to be done and, as it turned out, our mainsail proved a godsend in the last couple of days of our passage when we had consistent 20 – 30 knot winds from the south east.

23rd – 30th May 2016 – Passage from Hakaota Bay, Ua Pou, Marquesas to Raroia Atoll, Tuamotus, French Polynesia.
Distance: 420NM
Direction: 225 degrees
Expected passage time: 4 days

Monday 23 – Winds were around 8 – 10 knots from the SE, dropping overnight to 4 – 5 knots. Slow progress, even with the mainsail & MPS, but no hurry, right…? At 2330 we dropped the mainsail.
Tuesday 24 – Wind shifted around to E, then ENE 5 – 7 knots dying down to zero by afternoon. We were lucky to make 3 knots all day and spent much of the day just drifting. Meanwhile we dessicated some coconut and froze some bananas and sun-dried others. DSCN2245Our MPS was up and down like a bride’s nightie during the early days of this passage!
Wednesday 25 – By the start of day 3 we had sailed less than a quarter of the ‘4 day’ passage distance! Sure, we could have put on the engines and motored, but the grib (weather) files were showing that whichever direction we went, other than back to the Marquesas, there would be little to no wind, so we just went with it. We made banana bread, froze more bananas and made fishcakes. And of course we read and even watched movies!

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Thursday 26 – What wind we had blew from NNE and died again completely after some midday squalls, so more drifting….

Friday 27 – After 4 days at sea we had completed just 1/2 of our 420NM passage! Must be a record….. By 0900 we had to motor away from the squalls, so we were practically going backwards at this point! As the day went on, the wind picked up and so did the squalls, so we once again dropped the MPS and motored. Later in the afternoon, soon after we’d raised the MPS (yet again), the pin on the block in the spinnaker pole sheared and broke, so down came the MPS once again. By now we had more wind and decided to raise the mainsail. Unfortunately the wind changed its mind and direction yet again. It shifted round to the west, then to the SSW, which by this stage was our desired course, so we dropped the sails and motored through the night hoping for the elusive south east trade winds, which we’re now convinced are a myth!DSCN2257

Saturday 28 – By daybreak we finally had enough wind, albeit still from SSW, to raise the mainsail again. Unfortunately, as we did so we noticed a long tear between the 1st and 2nd reefing points! We put in the 2nd reef and started to finally make good progress, but the wind was certainly out to get us on this trip. Despite the grib files showing 4 – 5 knots from the NE, we were getting 16 – 20 knots from the SW by mid-morning. By midday the wind had picked up to 25 – 30 knots ON THE NOSE! By mid afternoon we were getting gusts up to 40 knots! At 1500 we hove to and waited out the winds and storms, but after battling rough, sloppy seas and almost head on winds through the night, we decided by mid-morning the next day that we really had little choice but to change course from Raroia to an atoll further to the west.
Sunday 29 – The strong winds continued through Sunday and having made the decision to change course for Kauehi Atoll, we set the sails and the wind (finally) gradually shifted around to the SE! Knowing that it would be a major challenge to head back to the eastern Tuamotus once we reached Kauehi, we decided to pinch as much east as we could and attempt to make landfall at the western end of Makemo or head for Tahanea, another 47 NM further south.
Monday 30 – As Monday progressed we continued on our course towards Tahanea. Unless we could get to Makemo before late afternoon it wasn’t worth risking entering the atoll as the Tuamotus are renowned for challenging passes and strong current as you enter the lagoons and it is vital to pick your times to enter and exit. DSCN2289 We slowed the boat down on dark so we could continue through the night in time to arrive at the pass into Tahanea at daylight.
Tuesday 31 May – What a beautiful starlit sky as we drifted outside the pass until daylight. By 0630, just 8 days after departing Ua Pou, we had dropped the anchor inside the lagoon at Tahanea, ready for a well-deserved rest!

 

 

Distance from Hakaota Bay, Ua Pou to Tahanea Atoll: 522NM as the crow flies
Actual distance travelled: 776NM!
Time: 8 days
Average speed: 4 knots

Postscript Saturday 4th June:
Having finally found an atoll with wifi, we have had a day of solid rain, not exactly conducive to going ashore and sitting on the wall outside the post office trying to pick up wifi and upload blog posts!! At least our water tanks are now completely full and we’ve had a pleasant onboard day getting these posts ready to upload when we finally do pick up the internet. Hope you enjoy them :) DSCN2301

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We are hoping to do some diving here in the Tuamotus, but so far we’ve had too much wind and rain to get out and explore. We have another couple of weeks here before we head to Tahiti for the Pacific Puddle Jump Rendezvous over the weekend of 24 – 26th June.

If you haven’t checked out our photos from the Marquesas, you can find them on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/AmarulaSail/

And remember, when we are on passage we will continue to send our progress reports to this link http://www.pangolin.co.nz/xtras/yotreps/tracker.php?ident=Amarula using our HF radio and we will pick up any emails sent to us via the contact page on our website
We will not be able to check Facebook though, so any comments and messages will only be picked up when we get access to the internet, which is something of a challenge when crossing the Pacific!

We have very limited bandwidth to post photos on our blog at present, but here the links to the Marquesas photos we have shared on our Amarula Sail Facebook page.

Photos from Fatu Hiva on Amarula Sail Facebook page

Photos from Tahuata

Photos from Hiva Oa

Photos from Ua Huka

Photos from our Nuku Hiva day trip and Daniel’s Bay

We will post more photos when we can…..

More of our albums from the past few years are here