Oceans of plastic trash…..

The other day we came across a disturbing movie trailer, which we would like to share in the hope of raising awareness, about the impact of trash that ends up in the ocean.

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The movie, due to be released later this year, tells the devastating story of how trash that ends up floating in the ocean is responsible for the death of thousands of baby albatrosses thousands of miles away across the Pacific Ocean.

This statement on their website http://www.midwayjourney.com/ says it all:

“On one of the remotest islands on our planet, tens of thousands of baby albatrosses lie dead on the ground, their bodies filled with plastic from the Pacific Garbage Patch.”

We urge you to watch this trailer and look out for the movie when it is released. AND be aware of where you dump your trash!

On our own travels across the Indian Ocean, around east and southern Africa and now the Caribbean, we are always astounded when we arrive at remote, uninhabited islands, only to find plastic & glass bottles, flip flops and other debris.

Here is a photo taken in October at Chacachacare, an uninhabited island off the north-west point of Trinidad. Unfortunately, due to it’s location, rubbish that swirls around the Gulf of Paria seems to end up on these beaches.

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Back in 2008, on our way back from Madagascar to Tanzania, we stopped off at this stunning island miles from anywhere and found a computer monitor washed up on the beach! On the same island was a large population of nesting boobies and terns.

2008 Iles Glorieuses

The photos  below show three of the Indian Ocean islands, we have visited, with large bird populations.

We were fortunate to be involved with a research charter to the Aldabra/ Cosmoledo Atolls back in November 2002, as part of a joint project between Kalmar University of Sweden and the Seychelles Island Foundation.

Then in December 2005, we took part in another study on Latham Island, just off the Tanzanian coast.

Ile Sud-ouest

Latham Island, 40NM off coast of Tanzania 2008 Iles Glorieuses birdlife